New Geico Insurance Commercial Appears To Feature Take Off On Marshall Barnes' Verdrehung Fan
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In a case of art imitating far-out life, Geico bows commercial featuring a wormhole time machine looking like Marshall Barnes, R&D Eng's invention, the Verdrehung Fan.

GRANDVIEW HEIGHTS, Ohio - OhioPen -- "I can't believe it," the middle aged male teacher says. "That Sophie opened up a wormhole
through time?", the middle aged woman teacher asks in stunned amazement. We suddenly see a strange throbbing machine, looking like a large table top fan with glowing light, instead of fan blades. Standing proudly beside it is a middle school aged girl with her arms folded in front of her. Suddenly, various figures from the past, as well as several small, insectoid robots from the future, are popping out and into the room.

"No," the male teacher answers. "I can't believe how easy it was to save hundreds of dollars on my car insurance with Geico."

To most, this was just another imaginative ad from the well known insurance company, but to others, it appeared to be a take off of the first time machine to open a connection outside of our spacetime. Marshall Barnes' Verdrehung Fan™.

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Created as his entry into a race with UConn's Ronald Mallett, famous for faking he had a time machine or plans for one, Marshall defeated Mallett in late November 2013 with his Verdrehung Fan™. Much like the Geico commercial, he often demonstrated it at schools, like Bexley and Grandview Heights high schools, the warp field it created, causing the fan, that rotated the field, to spin faster. Public demos included the device swallowing infrared and RF signals aimed at it, once the field had been activated for 25 minutes. Scientists noted that would violate Einstein's Special theory of Relativity unless something extraordinary was taking place. It supported Marshall's contention his STDTS™ field was warping space as it moved through it and, in the case of the Verdrehung Fan™, warping effects were forcing micro wormholes to stay open longer and be larger than normal.

Micro wormholes, theoretically all around us, are too small and not open long enough, for anything to enter. The STDTS™ powered Verdrehung Fan™ changed that. New Scientist magazine reported research out of Cambridge University suggested Casimir Effects could keep long wormholes open much longer than thought, allowing pulses of light through. Logically, the effect demonstrated by the Verdrehung Fan™ could involve micro wormholes.

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Marshall intends on capitalizing on the commercial.

"There's an obvious connection, conceptually. Maybe Geico will sponsor real life demos of this and other time travel physics, for schools. Hey, high school kids need car insurance, after all!"

Marshall will lecture on the New, True Science of Time Travel at the Silicon Valley Comic Con this coming weekend.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SE1Ghgsl2w4



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